Plastic Pollution - wie wir die Meere mit Plastik vermüllen und wie nicht

Kunststoff-Mikropartikel raus aus der Kosmetik – BEAT THE MICRO BEAD –

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtY-AMSKT6w&w=560&h=315]

Kunststoff-Mikropartikel raus aus der Kosmetik – BEAT THE MICRO BEAD –

„Without knowing it, most of you daily contribute to the Plastic Soup by scrubbing your body, brushing your teeth, cleaning your face or washing your hair, because the plastic micro beads inside these products will be washed down the drain. This debris are about the same size range as plankton organisms and marine species are not able to distinguish food from this micro plastic.
On top of that micro beads also concentrate persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and are thus a transport medium for toxic chemicals in the marine environment. The fish you eat may be poisoned because of this.
That’s why we should immediately BAN using plastic micro beads inside these products! I hereby urgently ask all Consumers worldwide to BOYCOTT products containing plastic ingredients and to SIGN this petition.“Captain Charles Moore
Plastic Soup Foundation
„In 2011 North Sea foundation started a study in the Netherlands of personal care products containing plastic particles (micro beads). It was assumed the micro beads were only used in scrubs and peelings. However, the micro beads were used in much broader spectrum. Shampoo, lip-gloss, toothpaste, … the list became longer and longer.
A laboratory study showed the amount of plastic used in products was very high (up to 10%, a coffee filter full of plastic) and sometimes very small (50 micro meter, these particles passed through a coffee filter).
Different studies show the micro beads can enter the marine environment and enter the ‚Plastic Soup‘. Reason enough to take action. Together with the Plastic Soup Foundation we want a ban on micro beads in personal care products and we call other organisations and people to join us.“

Jeroen Dagevos
North Sea Foundation

BEAT THE MICRO BEAD

The UNEP, the United Nations Environment Programme classified the Plastic Soup as one of the three most urgent environmental issues. Plastic Soup is the collective name for the serious problems in the sea, caused by plastic.

All plastic is made by people. And it is made so well, that it does not biodegrade. As long as we use plastic, there will always be plastic finding its way to the sea via rivers, canals and harbors.

There is hardly a solution for the problem called Plastic Soup. Because we use so much plastic, the problem will only get worse. Eventually plastic falls apart in even smaller particles under the influence of sunlight and waves, but it never decays or digests. The smaller the pieces of plastic, the more difficult it gets to retrieve them from the sea. Plastic will stay hundreds to thousands of years. It will not perish along a natural road.

Scientist are increasingly worried about these small pieces of plastics (micro plastics) that are sometimes so small that you can’t see them with the naked eye.

Without knowing it, most of us contribute daily to the Plastic Soup by scrubbing our body, brushing our teeth, cleaning our face or washing our hair, because the plastic micro beads inside these products will be washed down the drain. This debris is about the same size range as plankton organisms and marine species are not able to distinguish food from this micro plastic.
On top of that micro beads also concentrate persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and are thus a transport medium for toxic chemicals in the marine environment. The fish you eat may be poisoned because of this.

What can you do?

Check the label of the cosmetics you buy. If it contains plastic, you will find the word polyethylene polypropylene, polyethylen terephlatate or polymethyl methacrylate ‚ among the ingredients.

Check your bathroom- to see if you use products that contain micro plastics without realizing it.

Express your outrage in a letter to the producer or the retailers of these products and sign our petition on Facebook!

In the links below, it seems that there are hundreds and maybe even thousands of cosmetic products containing micro plastics.

We can’t solve the problem of Plastic Soup, but we can prevent it from getting worse.

www.plasticsoupfoundation.org

Sechste Strandmüllaktion im Rahmen des Clean Up Days erfolgreich

6. Strandmüllaktion im Rahmen des Internationalen Coastal Clean Up Days
erfolgreich

Hamburg: das heißt dicke Schiffe, lockere Wolken, spritziges Hochwasser und besonders fleißige Helfer!

Und mit reger Teilnahme haben diese heute den Elbstrand bei Övelgönne von dem Plastikmüll befreit. Vom Puppenschuh bis zur Batterie, war wieder einmal vieles zu finden am Strand und 3 volle Säcke mit ca 15 kg Müll konnten gesammelt werden. Eine tolle Aktion der ca. 30 freiwillegen Helfer, denen alle Meerestiere (und wir von Deepwave) hiermit herzlich danken.

Ein Photostream findet sich hier
http://www.flickr.com/photos/64068253@N00/

und auf Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/deepwave.org

6. DEEPWAVE Beach Clean up at the Elbe in Oevelgoenne, Hamburg

6. DEEPWAVE Beach Clean up at the Elbe in Oevelgoenne, Hamburg

The Marine conservation organization DEEPWAVE is organizing the int. ICC 27th litter collection day in Hamburg for the 6. time

° Litter collection day in Hamburg on the 15th September, 3pm, Museum Port – Övelgönne
° The plastic footprint: A staggering 6 million tons yearly increase of plastic litter in the world’s oceans
° Rivers deliver the trash to the seas
° Marine creatures die horribly as they mistake this litter for nourishment
° A practical solution would be avoidance of all litter on beaches and rivers

PRESS RELEASE Hamburg, 11th September 2012 – Plastic litter is is increasingly contaminating the worlds seas. The UN Environmental Authority states the increase as lying at a rate of 6.000.000 tons per year. In the Atlantic a plastic footprint equivalent in size to Germany and Poland together, consisting of human emanated waste swims around. Landfill rubbish, illegal trash disposal, fishing accessories, free-time activities on the coasts etc. all act together with the rivers as the deliverers of trash for carelessly disposed of land rubbish.

The accumulation of plastic trash in the oceans presents an acute danger for marine species It takes 450 years for plastic to finally rot. Every year this long living material is responsible for the death of thousands of marine organisms, through choking or entanglement.

In order to draw attention to this problem, the American environmental organization Ocean Conservancy organized the first international litter collection day as long as 27 years ago.

Since then, on the 3rd Saturday in September a coastal clean up day has taken place on the beaches and rivers of the world. Everyone who wants to, can take part.

In Hamburg, the Hamburger Marine Conservation organization DEEPWAVE is organizing for the 6th time this collection event. “Land based trash which has no business in our rivers and on our beaches, eg: cigarette butts, tampons, used fireworks, injection needles, and PET bottles find their way into the oceans “, explains the Marine biologist Dr. Onno Groß of DEEPWAVE on the typical contents of this floating plastic litter. Carelessness in disposal is mostly responsible – people just leave their trash lying around.

Things also don’t look to good along the Elbe beaches. Nearly 25% of Elbe sand consists today of minute plastic particles, which can, through the food chain, end up within the human metabolism.

A practical point towards a solution is seen by Dr.Groß, in an awareness programme, with a connected litter avoidance strategy, “if every beach visitor were to take their trash with them, this would contribute immensely in keeping the oceans and it’s inhabitants safe. A consequential division of house rubbish and the re-cycling of plastic waste is another point where all can contribute. Those who to wish to take part in our yearly clean-up action are also heartily welcome”.

In the long-term the only way to solve this problem is to achieve a reduction in the world-wide production of plastics. Onno Groß see’s within this context the positive influence of the consumer, and advises: “Check out your own shopping customs and behaviour, and in future disregard over packed plastic packaged foodstuffs.

Meeting point for the Elbe Litter Collection day is:
Hamburger Elbufer: on the 15th Septembert 2012, 3PM at the “Museumshafen Övelgönne” Hamburg West (Ferry from “Landungsbrücken”).

DEEPWAVE is dedicated to the protection and restoration of marine ecosystems and the species they sustain, through the development of innovative technologies, and conservation action based on scientific developments.

Deepwave e.V. ist eine in Hamburg 2003 gegründete Meeresschutzorganisation. Unter dem Motto „MEER- Bewusstsein MEER -Verantwortung MEER- Durchsetzung“ verfolgt die Initiative das Ziel, zur Entwicklung und Förderung umweltverträglicher Strukturen für das Ökosystem der Hoch- und Tiefsee beizutragen. Dabei stehen insbesondere Maßnahmen zur Bewusstseinssensibilisierung gegenüber Umweltgefährdungen im Fokus.

Kontakt
Dr. Onno Groß, Meeresbiologe und
1. Vorsitzender des Vereins DEEPWAVE e.V.
E-Mail: presse@deepwave.org
www.deepwave.org

Hintergrundmaterial
• www.deepwave.org
• www.oceanconservancy.org/icc

Bilder vom letzten Müllsammeltag finden sich hier:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/64068253@N00/sets/72157627700043960/

Kurzfilm zum Müllsammeltag 2007
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhMLqe_YN48&feature=related
Weiteres Film- und Fotomaterial schicken wir Ihnen gerne auf Anfrage zu.

Plastikmüll sammeln am Elbstrand

Plastikmüll sammeln am Elbstrand

Pressemitteilung

Meeresschutzorganisation Deepwave organisiert 27. Internationalen Müllsammeltag in Hamburg

• Müllsammeltag in Hamburg am 15. September, 15:00 Uhr, Museumshafen Övelgönne
• Plastik-Fußabdruck: Jährlicher Zuwachs von 6 Millionen Tonnen Plastikmüll in Weltmeeren
• Flüsse als Müllzubringer
• Meeresbewohner verenden durch Verwechslung mit Nahrung
• Müllvermeidung an Stränden und Flüssen als eine praktische Lösung

Hamburg, 11. September 2012 – Plastikmüll verschmutzt zunehmend die Weltmeere. Die UN Umweltschutzbehörde beziffert den Zuwachs auf 6.000.000 Tonnen jährlich. Im Atlantik bildet der von Menschen verursachte Plastik-Fußabdruck mittlerweile einen Teppich so groß wie die Fläche von Deutschland und Polen zusammen. Neben Mülldeponien, illegaler Müllbeseitigung, Fischereizubehör, Freizeitaktivitäten an Küsten etc. fungieren ebenso die Flüsse als „Mülllieferanten“ für achtlos hinterlassenen Landmüll.

Die Ansammlung von Plastikmüll in den Ozeanen stellt eine akute Gefahr für marine Arten dar. 450 Jahre dauert es, bis Plastik verrottet. Jedes Jahr kostet der langlebige Werkstoff Tausenden von Organismen das Leben, indem sie daran ersticken oder darin verwickelt werden.

Um auf dieses Problem aufmerksam zu machen, hat die amerikanische Umweltorganisation Ocean Conservancy bereits vor 27 Jahren den Internationalen Müllsammeltag ausgerufen. Seither erfolgen an jedem dritten Samstag im September Müllsammelaktionen an Stränden und Flüssen weltweit. Jeder, der will, kann mitmachen.

In Hamburg organisiert die Hamburger Meeresschutzorganisation Deepwave bereits zum sechsten Mal die Sammelaktion. „Landabfälle wie Zigarettenstumpen, Tampons, Silvesterknaller, Spritzen und PET-Flaschen finden ihren Weg in die Ozeane“, erklärt Meeresbiologe Dr. Onno Groß von Deepwave die typische Beschaffenheit des Plastiktreibguts. Oftmals sei hierfür Unachtsamkeit verantwortlich. Die Menschen lassen den Müll einfach liegen.

Auch um den Elbstrand sei es nicht gut bestellt. Fast 25 % des Elbsandstrandes (Quelle???) besteht bereits heute aus kleinsten Plastikkügelchen, die durch die Nahrungskette am Ende in den menschlichen Organismus gelangen können.

Groß sieht einen praktischen Lösungsansatz in der Schärfung des Problembewusstseins und damit einhergehenden Müllvermeidungsstrategie: „Wenn jeder Strandbesucher seinen Müll wieder mitnimmt, ist den Ozeanen und seinen Bewohnern bereits gedient. Auch konsequente Mülltrennung und das Recyceln von Plastikabfällen ist ein wichtiger Ansatz, bei dem jeder mithelfen kann. Wer sich zudem an der jährlichen Aufräumaktion beteiligt, ist herzlich willkommen“.

Langfristig sei dem Problem nur durch eine Reduzierung der weltweiten Plastikproduktion beizukommen. Onno Groß sieht hierbei einen positiven Einfluss der Verbraucher und rät: „Das eigene Einkaufsverhalten zu überdenken und künftig in Plastik verpackte Lebensmittel links liegen zu lassen“.

Treffpunkt für den Müllsammeltag am Elbufer in Hamburg: 15. September 2012, 15:00 Uhr Museumshafen Övelgönne. Gestellt werden Handschuhe und Müllbeutel. Gesammelt wird ca. 2-3 Stunden. Empfohlen wird wetterfeste Kleidung.

Deepwave e.V. ist eine in Hamburg 2003 gegründete Meeresschutzorganisation. Unter dem Motto „MEER- Bewusstsein MEER -Verantwortung MEER- Durchsetzung“ verfolgt die Initiative das Ziel, zur Entwicklung und Förderung umweltverträglicher Strukturen für das Ökosystem der Hoch- und Tiefsee beizutragen. Dabei stehen insbesondere Maßnahmen zur Bewusstseinssensibilisierung gegenüber Umweltgefährdungen im Fokus.

Kontakt
Dr. Onno Groß, Meeresbiologe und
1. Vorsitzender des Vereins DEEPWAVE e.V.
E-Mail: presse@deepwave.org
www.deepwave.org

Hintergrundmaterial
• www.deepwave.org
• www.oceanconservancy.org/icc

Bilder vom letzten Müllsammeltag finden sich hier:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/64068253@N00/sets/72157627700043960/

Kurzfilm zum Müllsammeltag 2007
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhMLqe_YN48&feature=related
Weiteres Film- und Fotomaterial schicken wir Ihnen gerne auf Anfrage zu.

PRESS RELEASE

Plastic collection day at the Elbe beach in Övelgönne – Hamburg
The Marine conservation organization DEEPWAVE is organizing the 27th litter collection day in Hamburg.

° Litter collection day in Hamburg on the 15th September, 3pm, Museum Port – Övelgönne
° The plastic footprint: A staggering 6 million tons yearly increase of plastic litter in the world’s oceans
° Rivers deliver the trash to the seas
° Marine creatures die horribly as they mistake this litter for nourishment
° A practical solution would be avoidance of all litter on beaches and rivers

Hamburg, 11th September 2012 – Plastic litter is is increasingly contaminating the worlds seas. The UN Environmental Authority states the increase as lying at a rate of 6.000.000 tons per year. In the Atlantic a plastic footprint equivalent in size to Germany and Poland together, consisting of human emanated waste swims around. Landfill rubbish, illegal trash disposal, fishing accessories, free-time activities on the coasts etc. all act together with the rivers as the deliverers of trash for carelessly disposed of land rubbish.

The accumulation of plastic trash in the oceans presents an acute danger for marine species It takes 450 years for plastic to finally rot. Every year this long living material is responsible for the death of thousands of marine organisms, through choking or entanglement.

In order to draw attention to this problem, the American environmental organization Ocean Conservancy organized the first international litter collection day as long as 27 years ago.

Since then, on the 3rd Saturday in September a coastal clean up day has taken place on the beaches and rivers of the world. Everyone who wants to, can take part.

In Hamburg, the Hamburger Marine Conservation organization DEEPWAVE is organizing for the 6th time this collection event. “Land based trash which has no business in our rivers and on our beaches, eg: cigarette butts, tampons, used fireworks, injection needles, and PET bottles find their way into the oceans “, explains the Marine biologist Dr. Onno Groß of DEEPWAVE on the typical contents of this floating plastic litter. Carelessness in disposal is mostly responsible – people just leave their trash lying around.

Things also don’t look to good along the Elbe beaches. Nearly 25% of Elbe sand consists today of minute plastic particles, which can, through the food chain, end up within the human metabolism.

A practical point towards a solution is seen by Dr.Groß, in an awareness programme, with a connected litter avoidance strategy, “if every beach visitor were to take their trash with them, this would contribute immensely in keeping the oceans and it’s inhabitants safe. A consequential division of house rubbish and the re-cycling of plastic waste is another point where all can contribute. Those who to wish to take part in our yearly clean-up action are also heartily welcome”.

In the long-term the only way to solve this problem is to achieve a reduction in the world-wide production of plastics. Onno Groß see’s within this context the positive influence of the consumer, and advises: “Check out your own shopping customs and behaviour, and in future disregard over packed plastic packaged foodstuffs.

Meeting point for the Elbe Litter Collection day is:
Hamburger Elbufer: on the 15th Septembert 2012, 3PM at the “Museumshafen Övelgönne” Hamburg West (Ferry from “Landungsbrücken”).

BEAT THE MICRO BEAD – Kunststoff-Mikropartikel raus aus der Kosmetik

BEAT THE MICRO BEAD

Kunststoff-Mikropartikel aus Körperpflegeprodukten landen in den Meeren

(Text von marine-litter.blog.de)

Kaum jemandem ist bekannt, dass vielen Körperpflegeprodukten wie Duschpeelings, Zahncremes oder auch Kontaktlinsenreinigern Kunststoffkügelchen beigemischt werden, um eine bessere Reinigungswirkung zu erzielen. Diese Kügelchen gelangen nach ihrem Gebrauch in unseren Meeren, da sie selbst Klärwerke passieren. Kunststoff-Mikropartikel sind bereits in Fischen, Seehunden, Muscheln und Krebsen nachgewiesen worden. Die Meerestiere verwechseln diese mit ihrem natürlichen Futter. Somit haben Kunststoff-Mikropartikel bereits Einzug in die Nahrungskette erhalten, an deren Ende der Mensch steht.

Project Blue Sea und DEEPWAVE hat sich einer Initiative angeschlossen, die von der niederländischen Plastic Soup Foundation in Zusammenarbeit mit Captain Charles Moore ins Leben gerufen wurde. Die Kampagne „BEAT THE MICRO BEAD“ soll Hersteller von Körperpflegeprodukten dazu bewegen, die Kunststoffkügelchen in Körperpflegeprodukten durch natürliche, umweltschonende Materialien zu ersetzen und Händler dazu auffordern, Produkte mit Mikropartikeln aus Kunststoff aus ihrem Sortiment zu nehmen.
Auch auf politischem Wege soll im Rahmen der Kampagne gearbeitet werden, um ein Verbot von Kunststoff-Mikropartikeln in Körperpflegeprodukten zu erwirken.

Bitte unterstützen Sie unsere Arbeit und unterschreiben Sie folgende Petition:
Ban all cosmethics with micro beads!!!

http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/BEAT_THE_MICRO_BEAD_BAN_all_Cosmetics_with_micro_beads_Polyethylene_PE_plastics_inside/?cngprdb

Link zur Plastic Soup Foundation.
http://plasticsoupfoundation.org/

6. DEEPWAVE-Strandmüllsammeltag Sa. 15.9.2012


Foto: Candive/C. Schmitt

Machen Sie doch mit beim großen 6. DEEPWAVE-Müllsammeltag

Sa. 15. September 2012
ab 15 Uhr
Treffpunkt: Museumshafen Övelgönne, Hamburg

Flaschen, Dosen, Kippen, Tüten, Grillreste – unsere Strände sind voll von diesem Müll. Abfall aus Glas, Aluminium, Tabak, Kohle, Papier, vor allem aber aus Plastik. Dieser Unrat verunstaltet nicht nur unsere Ufer und birgt Verletzungsgefahren, er bedroht letztlich die Ökosysteme der Meere. Denn Strandmüll landet oft im Ozean. Schätzungsweise eine Million Seevögel, 100.000 Meeressäuger und unzählige Fische sterben jährlich weltweit an dieser Verschmutzung. Schildkröten verfangen sich in Plastiktüten und verenden qualvoll. Albatrosse verhungern, weil ihre Mägen voll gestopft sind mit kleinen Plastikteilchen.

Laut einer Studie der UNEP (Umweltprogramm der UN) befinden sich heute zehntausende Plastikteile auf jedem Quadratkilometer Meeresfläche. Das muss nicht sein! Den eigenen Müll wieder mitnehmen ist die effektivste und einfachste Lösung. Leider beachten das nur wenige. Deshalb will DEEPWAVE e.V. als deutscher Partner des „International Coastal Cleanup Day“ auf die Vermüllung aufmerksam machen und einen Teil des Elbestrands reinigen.

Das große Sammeln starten wir am Samstag, 15. September 2012,
um 15 Uhr am
Övelgönner Museumshafen
(Bus 112 von Altona oder Fähren von Landungsbrücken sowie von Finkenwerder).

Von hier beginnend, arbeiten wir uns hoch zur „Strandperle“ und weiter bis Teufelsbrück. Gemeinsames Handeln ist nicht nur sinnvoll, es macht auch Spaß!

Kontakt: info@deepwave.org

Mehr Schutz für die Meere – wir tun was dafür! Unterstützen Sie die Arbeit von Deepwave e.V., bitte auch finanziell! Spendenkonto: Deepwave e.V., Konto: 1208 116 713, HASPA, BLZ: 20050550. Als gemeinnütziger Verein sind Spenden an DEEPWAVE e.V. voll steuerlich abzugsfähig und Sie erhalten von uns eine Spendenbescheinigung.

Plastikmüll in Gewässern messen

Abb: Plastikmüll im Korallenriff gefährdet die Tierwelt (c: Wolf Wichmann/Eucc/Deepwave)

Plastikmüll in Gewässern

Plastikmüll landet oft in Gewässern und verbleibt dort mit ungewissen Folgen für das Ökosystem. Weil diese Kontamination nun erstmals präzise analysiert werden kann, lassen sich auch die Auswirkungen auf Mensch und Tier besser untersuchen.

Synthetische Kunststoffe sind fester Bestandteil des modernen Lebens – nicht zuletzt als kaum abbaubarer Abfall. Ein Großteil davon gelangt über die Flüsse ins Meer. Im Nordpazifik etwa hat sich mit dem „Great Pacific Garbage Patch“ ein gigantischer schwimmender Teppich aus Plastikmüll gebildet, der eine Gefahr für die dort lebenden Organismen darstellt. Werden die bunten Kunststoffteile mit natürlicher Nahrung verwechselt und gefressen, können sie den Verdauungstrakt blockieren oder aber den Hormonhaushalt der Tiere massiv stören.

Kleinere Kunststoffpartikel im Millimeter- und Mikrometerbereich sind nicht weniger weit verbreitet und nicht weniger gefährlich, vor allem weil sie sich über „Bioakkumulation“ entlang der Nahrungskette anreichern. Bislang konnte die Verschmutzung aquatischer Ökosysteme durch Kunststoffe aber nicht exakt bestimmt und damit das Risiko nicht umfassend abgeschätzt werden. „Mit Hilfe einer neuen Methode können wir jetzt ökologisch relevante Plastikpartikel aus dem Sediment über eine Dichtetrennung quantifizieren“, sagt der LMU-Biologie Professor Christian Laforsch.

Plastik auf dem Prüfstand

Der „Munich Plastic Sediment Separator“ (MPSS) wurde zusammen mit Forschern der TU München aus dem Institut für Wasserchemie und Chemische Balneologie in München entwickelt. Das Gerät erlaubt, unterschiedliche Plastikpartikel bis zu einer Größe von weniger als einem Millimeter aus aquatischem Sediment zu extrahieren, zu quantifizieren und auch zu identifizieren. „Unsere Methode ist herkömmlichen Ansätzen deutlich überlegen“, sagt Hannes Imhof, der Erstautor der Studie.

Viele Anwendungen sind denkbar, denn eine Separations und-Identifikationsrate von bis zu 100 Prozent ist bislang unerreicht, auch etwa in der Recycling-Industrie. „Die Problematik rund um Plastikmüll in aquatischen Ökosystemen ist ein hochaktuelles und zukunftsträchtiges Forschungsgebiet“, sagt Laforsch. „Wir können jetzt die Belastung von Gewässern mit Plastik exakt nachweisen und damit die Auswirkungen auf die Lebewesen in diesen essentiellen und zugleich hochempfindlichen Lebensräumen untersuchen. Über das Trinkwasser und Speisefische gehört dazu natürlich nicht zuletzt auch der Mensch.“ (suwe)

Publikation:
A novel, highly efficient method for the separation and quantification of plastic particles in sediments of aquatic environments
Hannes K. Imhof, Johannes Schmid, Reinhard Niessner, Natalia P. Ivleva, and Christian Laforsch
Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, Juli 2012
Doi 10.4319/lom.2012.10.524

http://www.uni-muenchen.de/forschung/news/2012/f-32-12.html

Ansprechpartner:
Professor Christian Laforsch

E-Mail: laforsch@zi.biologie.uni-muenchen.de
Web: http://sci.bio.lmu.de/ecology/evol_e/people_laforsch_e.html

Ein Jahr „Fishing for Litter“

NABU: Ein Jahr „Fishing for Litter“ – Vor allem Schiffsmüll landet in den Netzen

„Gefischte“ Abfälle können in drei deutschen Ostseehäfen entsorgt werden

Berlin – Ein Jahr nach dem Start des ersten „Fishing-for-Litter“-Projektes in Deutschland hat der NABU eine erste Auswertung „gefischter Abfälle“ aus dem Ostseeraum vorliegen. Metall, aber auch Kunststoffe, Textilien, Holz und Glas landen immer wieder in den Netzen der Fischer. Unterstützt von zahlreichen Partnern, stellt der NABU sicher, dass auf See gefischte Abfälle an Land gebracht und dort entsorgt und nicht zurück ins Meer geworfen werden. Inzwischen beteiligen sich in drei Ostseehäfen mehr als 30 Fischer. „Wir freuen uns über die erfolgreiche Zusammenarbeit mit Fischern, Abfallentsorgern und Kommunen. Die positiven Erfahrungen des ersten Jahres wollen wir nutzen und das Projekt weiter ausbauen“, so NABU-Präsident Olaf Tschimpke.

Startschuss in Burgstaaken und Heiligenhafen war am 5. Mai 2011, am 19. April dieses Jahres kam mit Sassnitz der dritte Ostseehafen hinzu. Die Idee hinter dem Projekt ist dabei so einfach wie effektiv. Den Fischern wird eine kostenlose Logistik zur Verfügung gestellt. Große Industriesäcke dienen der Müllsammlung an Bord, in den Häfen stehen Container bereit, die regelmäßig ausgetauscht werden. Die „gefischten“ Abfälle aber werden nicht einfach entsorgt, sondern in einer speziellen Sortieranlage auf ihre Zusammensetzung untersucht. So wollen die Projektpartner mehr über den Müll in der Ostsee erfahren. Denn Daten zur Belastung der Ostsee durch Abfälle sind bisher rar.

Anfang 2012 wurde der erste Müll untersucht. Die Ergebnisse bestätigen die vermutete heterogene Zusammensetzung der Abfälle. Viele der Fundstücke geben auch Hinweise auf ihre Herkunft. Während bei NABU-eigenen Untersuchungen im Bereich des Spülsaums überwiegend Abfälle von Touristen und Wassersportlern gefunden werden, handelt es sich bei den „gefischten“ Abfällen in erster Linie um industrielle Abfälle aus der Berufs- oder auch der Sportschifffahrt.

„Es scheint immer noch gängige Praxis zu sein, alte, teilweise noch gefüllte Fässer, Dosen mit Farb- und Lackresten, Tauwerk oder ausgedientes Ölzeug von den Schiffen einfach über Bord zu werfen. Nur so erklärt sich deren hoher Anteil in unseren Containern. Das ist zwar verboten, aber Kontrollen und Strafen scheinen nicht ausreichend“, so NABU-Meeresschutzexperte und Projektleiter Kim Detloff.

Noch reicht die Stichprobe nicht, um abschließende Aussagen zum Müll am Grund der Ostsee treffen zu können. Daher verständigten sich die Projektpartner darauf, die Abfälle auch zukünftig auf ihre Zusammensetzung zu untersuchen. Darüber hinaus soll eine Studie Auskunft darüber geben, ob die Kunststoffabfälle noch wiederverwertbar sind.

Die Allianz gegen die Müllkippe Meer wird durch das Engagement des NABU-Projekts immer größer. Partner in Schleswig-Holstein sind die Fischergenossenschaften Fehmarn und Heiligenhafen, der Landesfischereiverband Schleswig-Holstein, die ZVO Entsorgung sowie die Städte Fehmarn und Heiligenhafen. Auf Rügen unterstützen die Kutter- und Küstenfisch Rügen GmbH, die Nehlsen GmbH & Co. KG sowie der Stadthafen Sassnitz. Überregionaler Projektpartner ist Der Grüne Punkt Duales System Deutschland GmbH.

Im Sommer 2010 startete das NABU-Projekt „Meere ohne Plastik“. Neben dem
„Fishing for Litter“ initiierte der NABU seit dem Sammelaktionen an Stränden, beteiligt sich am wissenschaftlichen Umwelt-Monitoring, erarbeitet verschiedene Informationsmaterialien und führte Informations- und Bildungsveranstaltungen zum Thema durch.

Für Rückfragen:

* Dr. Kim Cornelius Detloff, NABU-Referent für Meeresschutz und Projektleiter, Telefon 030 – 284984 1626, Mobil 0152-0920 2205
* Janosch Hill, NABU-Projektmitarbeiter Meeresschutz, Telefon 04372-8069874


Im Internet zu finden unter www.NABU.de

Müllhalde Meer

Diese Sammlung kleiner Plastikreste gibt einen ersten Überblick über die Formenvielfalt des Mikromülls. Im Vergleich zu den allerkleinsten Partikeln (Größe 0,001 Millimeter) sind die hier abgebildeten Beispiele jedoch noch wahre Riesen. Foto: Stefanie Meyer, Alfred-Wegener-Institut

Müllhalde Meer: Biologen erstellen Leitfaden für eine genauere Untersuchung der Meeresverschmutzung durch Mikroplastikpartikel

Bremerhaven, 16. April 2012. Große Mengen der weltweit produzierten Kunststoffe enden in den Ozeanen. Dort stellen sie eine zunehmende Bedrohung dar. Vor allem sehr kleine Objekte, sogenannte Mikroplastikpartikel, gefährden das Leben vieler Meeresbewohner. Eine Einschätzung, wie stark die Ozeane mit Mikroplastikpartikeln belastet sind, scheiterte bisher, weil weltweit vergleichbare Untersuchungsmethoden und Daten fehlen. Gemeinsam mit britischen und chilenischen Kollegen haben Wissenschaftler des Alfred-Wegener-Institutes für Polar- und Meeresforschung in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft nun alle veröffentlichten Studien zu diesem Thema ausgewertet und standardisierte Richtlinien für die Erfassung und Charakterisierung der Mikroplastik-Partikel im Meer vorgeschlagen.

Angespülte Plastikflaschen gehören heutzutage ebenso zu einem Strandspaziergang wie das Kreischen der Möwen. Was dem menschlichen Auge jedoch verborgen bleibt, sind die unzähligen Kleinstobjekte aus Kunststoff, die im Wasser schwimmen, an den Strand gespült werden oder den Meeresboden bedecken. Wissenschaftler bezeichnen diese Plastikteilchen als „Mikroplastikpartikel“ und verstehen darunter Kunststoffobjekte, deren Durchmesser weniger als fünf Millimeter betragen – wobei die meisten Mikroplastikpartikel kleiner als ein Sandkorn oder eine Nadelspitze sind. Diese Eigenschaft macht sie auch so gefährlich für Meeresbewohner. „Mikroplastikpartikel werden von Organismen verschluckt und über den Verdauungstrakt aufgenommen. So konnten sie zum Beispiel bereits im Gewebe von Miesmuscheln oder anderen Tieren nachgewiesen werden“, sagt Dr. Lars Gutow, Biologe am Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft. Im Meer lagern sich an den kleinen Partikeln zudem toxische Stoffe an, die auf diese Weise in die Nahrungskette gelangen und so schließlich auch dem Menschen gefährlich werden können.

Lars Gutow und Kollegen von der Universidad Católica del Norte in Chile und der School of Marine Science and Engineering in Plymouth sind nun gemeinsam der Frage nachgegangen, wie stark die Weltmeere mit Mikroplastikpartikeln belastet sind. Dazu haben die Biologen 68 wissenschaftliche Veröffentlichungen zu diesem Thema analysiert und festgestellt, dass sich deren Ergebnisse nur schwer miteinander vergleichen lassen. „In diesen Studien wurde mit ganz unterschiedlichen Methoden gearbeitet, weshalb nicht nachvollziehbar war, ob die beobachteten regionalen Verteilungsunterschiede der Plastikpartikel real sind oder ob sie auf die Erfassungsmethoden zurückzuführen sind“, sagt Prof. Martin Thiel, Initiator der nun veröffentlichten Vergleichsuntersuchung und Wissenschaftler an der Universidad Católica del Norte. So habe sich unter anderem gezeigt, dass 100.000-mal mehr Mikroplastikpartikel aus der Wassersäule gefischt werden konnten, wenn anstelle eines Netzes mit Maschenweite 450 Mikrometer ein Modell mit 85 Mikrometern eingesetzt wurde.

Basierend auf diesen Erkenntnissen hat das internationale Forscherteam nun erstmals Richtlinien für die Erfassung und Charakterisierung der Mikroplastikpartikel erstellt und diese im Fachmagazin Environmental Science & Technology veröffentlicht. Darin erläutern die Wissenschaftler auch mögliche Herkunftsquellen des Plastikabfalls. „Mikroplastikpartikel gelangen auf unterschiedlichen Wegen in die Meere. Ein Großteil sind sogenannte Plastikpellets, die als Rohstoff für die Herstellung von Kunststoffprodukten wie Computergehäusen oder andere Gebrauchsartikeln dienen. Geht man mit diesen Pellets, beispielsweise beim Verladen auf Schiffe, sorglos um, können viele davon durch den Wind verweht werden und ins Meer gelangen“, erklärt Lars Gutow.

Mikroplastikpartikel stecken aber auch in Kosmetik- und Reinigungsmittel. „In so manchem Peeling-Produkt werden kleinste Plastikpartikel als ‚Scheuermittel’ verwendet. Über das Abwasser und die Flüsse gelangen sie dann ins Meer“, sagt der Biologe. Und schließlich zerfalle jede Plastikflasche, jede Plastiktüte, die im Meer schwimme, eines Tages in zahllose Mikropartikel. „Der Abbau größerer Plastikteile kann Jahrhunderte dauern und erfolgt vor allem durch physikalische Prozesse. Die UV-Strahlung der Sonne lässt den Kunststoff brüchig werden. Durch den Wellenschlag und Abriebprozesse werden sie dann in immer kleinere Teile zerbrochen“, so Lars Gutow.

Die kleinsten bisher nachgewiesenen Partikel besaßen einen Durchmesser von einem Mikrometer – das entspricht einem tausendstel Millimeter. Um solch winzige Kunststoffobjekte genau zu bestimmen und ihre Herkunft zu klären, sind aufwendige Untersuchungen nötig. „Wir empfehlen jedem Wissenschaftler, sehr kleine Mikroplastikpartikel mithilfe einer Infrarot-Spektroskopie zu analysieren. Dieses Verfahren entlarvt die Inhaltsstoffe und ermöglicht so eine genaue Identifizierung als Kunststoff“, sagt Lars Gutow.

In ihrem Forschungsleitfaden weisen die Wissenschaftler zudem auf Wissenslücken hin. „Das Thema ‚Plastik im Meer’ hat in den vergangenen Jahren deutlich an Bedeutung gewonnen. Es wird sehr viel geforscht. Trotzdem wissen wir zum Beispiel noch nicht, ob und wenn ja, in welcher Menge Mikroplastikpartikel an Felsküsten und in Salzwiesen abgelagert werden. Vor allem letztere sind bekannt dafür, dass sie ein hohes Rückhaltepotenzial für Partikel ausweisen. Ob dies auch für Mikroplastikpartikel gilt, ist bisher nicht bekannt“, sagt Martin Thiel, der die Belastung der chilenischen Küste durch Mikroplastikpartikel untersucht.

Wenn zukünftig, basierend auf den Empfehlungen dieser Vergleichsstudie, alle Meeresforscher standardisierte Methoden zur Erfassung der Mikroplastikpartikel anwenden, dürfte nicht nur die Aussagekraft ihrer Ergebnisse deutlich steigen. Es bestünde zudem die Chance, realistische Aussagen darüber zu machen, wo und wie stark die Weltmeere wirklich mit Mikroplastikpartikeln belastet sind und welche Konsequenzen diese Verschmutzung für die Ökosysteme und somit auch für den Menschen hat.

Der Titel der Originalveröffentlichung lautet:
Hidalgo-Ruz, Valeria / Gutow, Lars / Thompson, Richard C. / Thiel, Martin (2012): Microplastics in the Marine Environment: A Review of the Methods Used for Identification and Quantification, Environmental Science & Technology, 46, 3060-3075,

http://www.awi.de/de/aktuelles_und_presse/pressemitteilungen/detail/item/microplastics_in_the_marine_environment/?cHash=afbb249f9740724fb96cdcbec9c38f34

7. Kieler Marktplatz – Verschmutzung der Meere (II) – Marine Litter

Januar und Februar waren für mich zwei Monate, in denen ich für den Meeresschutz kaum Zeit hatte. Auf die nachfolgende Veranstaltung bin ich erst heute durch einen Hinweis von DEEPWAVE e.V. aufmerksam geworden.

7. Kieler Marktplatz – Verschmutzung der Meere (II) – Marine Litter
Am 15.1.2012 fand bereits zum 7. Mal der Kieler Marktplatz statt. Die Veranstaltung, die gemeinsam vom Exzellenzcluster Ozean der Zukunft und dem Maritimen Cluster Norddeutschland, Geschäftsstelle Schleswig-Holstein entwickelt und durchgeführt wird, hat sich mittlerweile als Plattform zum Wissenstransfer und zum Knüpfen von Netzwerken zwischen Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft, Politik und Organisationen etabliert.

Beim 7. Kieler Marktplatz stand die Verschmutzung der Meere durch Kunststoffe im Vordergrund. Als erste Referentin legte Frau Dr. Christiane Zarfl (Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.) in Vortrag „Auf und davon! Die unergründlichen Weg der Kunststoffe im Meer“ die Grundlagen. Mit der stetig anwachsenden Produktion von Kunststoffprodukten zeigen Monitoring-Programme, dass sich auch die Mengen an Kunststoffabfällen in den Weltmeeren erhöhen und an Stränden, im Sediment und in Meereswirbeln anreichern. Besondere Aufmerksamkeit erlangte in den letzten Jahren sogenanntes Mikroplastik, das sich durch eine Größe von weniger als 1 mm auszeichnet und bereits im Kreislaufsystem von Muscheln wieder gefunden werden konnte. Hinzu kommt, dass Kunststoffe zum einen als Transportvektor für Schadstoffe in entlegene Gebiete dienen und zum anderen zur Akkumulation in marinen Nahrungsketten bis hin zum Menschen beitragen können.

Den nachfolgenden Vortrag „Ein Hochseevogel als Indikator für die Plastikmüllbelastung der Nordsee – die OSPAR Fulmar-Litter-EcoQO-Studie“ hielt Nils Guse (FTZ Forschungs- und Technologiezentrum Westküste).
Zur Überwachung der anhaltend hohen Verschmutzung der Nordsee wurde auf der Nordsee-Ministerkonferenz 2002 die Einführung von messbaren ökologischen Qualitätszielen beschlossen (Ecological Quality Objectives = EcoQOs). Im Rahmen eines von der EU geförderten internationalen Projekts wurde daraufhin die Anzahl von Plastikmüllteilen in Eissturmvogelmägen als Indikator der Belastung der Nordsee mit Plastikmüll getestet. Abschließend wurde als Zielwert für die Plastikmüllbelastung der Nordsee empfohlen, dass weniger als 10 % der Eissturmvögel 0,1 g oder mehr Plastikmüll im Magen haben sollten. Derzeit liegen 60% der Eissturmvögel in der Nordsee oberhalb dieser Schwelle, bei 95% von ihnen lässt sich Plastikmüll nachweisen, der sich aus durchschnittlich 30 Partikeln bzw. 0,33 g Plastikmüll zusammensetzt. Der Referent wies darauf hin, dass dieses Projekt erfreulicherweise auch auf in der näheren Zukunft fortgeführt wird.

Quelle und mehr Informationen: http://www.ozean-der-zukunft.de/?id=928

Leider wurde nur einer der Vorträge online veröffentlicht:

Auf und davon! Die unergründlichen Wege der Kunststoffe im Meer
Dr. Christiane Zarfl, Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei ( IGB ) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

Weitere Informationen im EUCC-D Küsten-Newsletter 2/2012 auf S. 4.

//